Categories:  Faculty

Controversial chemical

Gail Prins

Gail Prins, professor of urology and physiology, discusses the health effects and controversy surrounding the chemical additive BPA in the March 4 issue of Newsweek.

 

“There’s too much data consistent across studies … time and time again … to ignore it and suggest BPA has no effect on humans.”

 

Gail Prins, professor of urology and physiology, on the health effects and controversy surrounding the chemical additive BPA, March 4 Newsweek

 

 

“Men are more likely to be promoted based on very few accomplishments in this industry. Women are so busy knocking themselves out to do the job, they are less able to promote themselves and they lose out.”

 

Nancy Valentine, associate dean in the College of Nursing, on the obstacles women face in the health care professions, March 8 Healthline.com

 

 

“If children grow up associating success with material goods, over time, they will focus too much on the end material good to define success and lose sight of the less tangible signs of success such as personal happiness with achieving goals.”

 

Lan Nguyen Chaplin, associate professor of managerial studies, on a study about rewarding children with material items, March 6 CBSNews.com