UIC psychologist to lead research organization

Linda Skitka, professor of psychology. Photo: Mark Schacht

Linda Skitka, UIC professor of psychology. Photo: Mark Schacht

Linda J. Skitka, professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, has been elected the 2019 president of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), the world’s largest organization of social and personality psychology researchers.

Skitka, who is currently a member-at-large on the society’s board of directors, will serve as president‐elect in 2018 and past president in 2020.

Her widely published research covers the study of moral and political psychology, moral conviction, ideological differences, social psychological consequences of terrorism, research methods and statistics.

A statement from the society notes she is well-respected by her peers in the research community, both in the U.S. and abroad.

“In addition to being an outstanding researcher, she cares so much about the future of the field and ensuring we are supporting students,” said Chad Rummel, SPSP executive director.  “Linda’s dedication to promoting diversity and pushing SPSP to be a central forum for discussion in the field will help SPSP continue to grow.”

Skitka has previously served as president of the Midwestern Psychological Association and the International Society for Justice Research, and she was chair and a founding member of the Consortium for the Advancement of Social and Personality Science. She has also served in editorial positions for several journals and been recognized for her contributions in mentoring and advising.

Skitka, a UIC faculty member since 1994, earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan and master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Established in 1974, the society’s mission is to produce and disseminate knowledge about personality and social psychology, facilitate the careers of students and professionals, and recognize and promote achievements in personality and social psychology.